As your doctor may have already told you, you need to have an Essure Confirmation Test 3 months after the Essure procedure to confirm that you can rely on Essure for birth control. Until your doctor tells you that you can rely on Essure, you MUST use another form of birth control.

What is the Essure Confirmation Test?

The Essure Confirmation Test verifies that the inserts are in the correct location and sometimes tests whether the tubes are blocked. The Essure Confirmation Test can be a modified HSG or a transvaginal ultrasound (TVU). Your doctor will determine which Essure Confirmation Test is appropriate for you. In some cases, it may be necessary to have both tests.

What does the test involve?

During the modified HSG, a special contrast dye is injected into your uterus. The dye is visible on x-rays. This lets the doctor confirm that the inserts are properly placed and that your tubes are blocked.

During the TVU, an ultrasound device will be placed into your vagina. The ultrasound will enable your doctor to see the Essure inserts within your fallopian tubes and determine if the inserts are in the proper place. If the doctor is unable to determine if the inserts are in the proper place with the TVU, you will need to have a modified HSG.

If you have experienced unusual post-procedure pain or have undergone treatment that suppress your immune system such as chemotherapy or use of corticosteroids such as prednisone, talk to your doctor before scheduling the Essure Confirmation Test, as the TVU test is not appropriate for you.

When should I have the Essure Confirmation test?

You should have the test 3 months after your Essure procedure. However, it’s important to remember that for some women, it may take longer than 3 months for Essure to completely block the fallopian tubes, If this happens, you will need a repeat test at 6 months.

What do I need to know about backup birth control?

Talk to your doctor about which method of birth control you should use for the 3 months after the procedure. Most women can remain on their current birth control. Talk to your doctor if you are currently using an IUD.

When can I stop using a backup form of birth control?

You can stop using a backup form of birth control only after your doctor has reviewed your Essure Confirmation Test results, and determined that you can rely on Essure for birth control.

Do I really need the Essure Confirmation Test?

Yes. The Essure Confirmation Test is an important and necessary step in the Essure procedure. You must continue to use another form of birth control until you have your Essure Confirmation Test and your doctor tells you that you can rely on Essure for birth control. For some women, it may take longer than 3 months for Essure to completely block the fallopian tubes. If this happens you will need a repeat Essure Confirmation Test at 6 months.

Are there any risks associated with the Essure Confirmation Test?

The modified HSG test uses an x-ray, so you may be exposed to very low levels of radiation if an x-ray is performed. Some women may also experience nausea and/or vomiting, dizziness and/or fainting, cramping, pain or discomfort. In rare cases, women may experience spotting and/or infection.

To learn more about the Essure Confirmation Test, click here.