Looking for more information about Essure? You’ve come to the right place.

Essure is the only permanent birth control method with a non-surgical procedure. Already considering Essure? You might have questions about the Essure procedure or what Essure permanent birth control could mean for you. Get some answers here. And, as always, talk to your doctor about any questions or concerns you have.

About Essure

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What is Essure?

Essure is a permanent birth control method that works with your body to create a natural barrier against pregnancy. The procedure involves permanently placing a soft, flexible insert into each fallopian tube. Over a period of about 3 months, a natural barrier forms around the inserts which prevents sperm from reaching your eggs. Three months after your Essure procedure, you will need to have a confirmation test to determine if you can rely on Essure for birth control. Your doctor will advise you on the type of test that is right for you.

IMPORTANT: For some women, it may take longer than 3 months for Essure to completely block the fallopian tubes, requiring a repeat confirmation test at 6 months. You must see your doctor for the Essure Confirmation Test before you can rely on Essure for birth control. Until you receive confirmation from your doctor you must continue to use another form of birth control to prevent pregnancy.

Find out more

How effective is Essure?

Essure is over 99% effective at permanently preventing pregnancy.*

*Based on clinical study data.

How long has Essure been available?

Essure has been FDA-approved and available in the US since 2002.

What are the benefits of Essure?

  • Non-surgical Procedure—the Essure procedure is usually completed in about 10 minutes and can be performed right in your doctor’s office
  • Quick recovery—most women go home 45 minutes after the procedure and return to normal activities within a day or two
  • Non-hormonal—Essure inserts do not contain or release any hormones
  • Proven—Essure is over 99% effective at permanently preventing pregnancy*
  • FDA-approved—Essure has been available for over 10 years
  • Used by many—approximately 750,000 women and their doctors have chosen Essure for permanent birth control. To hear what some of them have to say,
    click here
  • May be available at no cost—If you have health insurance, Essure might be fully covered.
    Learn more here

*Based on clinical study data.
Based on units sold worldwide.
Some restrictions may apply.

Is Essure right for me?

Essure might be right for you if:

  • You are certain you do not want any more children
  • You desire permanent birth control
  • You would like to stop worrying about getting pregnant
  • You prefer a method or procedure that:
    • Does not take a lot of time
    • Can be done in your doctor's office
    • Does not require surgery or general anesthesia
    • Does not contain hormones

Essure is NOT right for you if:

  • You suspect that you are pregnant
  • You have only one fallopian tube
  • You have one or both fallopian tubes closed or obstructed
  • You have had your “tubes tied” (tubal ligation)
  • You are allergic to contrast dye used during X-ray exams
  • You are unwilling to undergo the Essure Confirmation Test
  • You are uncertain about ending your fertility

You should wait to have the Essure procedure if:

  • You are or have been pregnant within the past 6 weeks
  • You have had a recent pelvic infection
  • You are in the second half (weeks 3 and 4) of your menstrual cycle. During that time there is an increased risk of being pregnant prior to having the Essure procedure

You should speak to your doctor if:

  • You are taking or receiving therapy that suppresses your immune system. Examples include chemotherapy or corticosteroids, such as prednisone. Therapy that suppresses the immune system may make the Essure procedure less effective for birth control
  • You have, or think you may have, a nickel allergy

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Has Essure been reviewed by the FDA?

Essure was approved by the FDA in 2002. See the FDA information on Essure here.

See what other women are saying about Essure here.

About the Essure procedure

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How does Essure work?

Essure is a non-hormonal permanent birth control method that works with your body to create a natural barrier against pregnancy. The Essure procedure involves permanently placing a soft, flexible insert into each of your fallopian tubes. Over a period of about 3 months, a natural barrier forms around the inserts that keeps sperm from reaching the eggs and prevents conception. During the 3-month period, you must continue to use another form of birth control.

Find out more

What are the Essure inserts made of? Do they contain hormones?

The soft, flexible, coil-shaped Essure inserts are made from materials, including polyester fibers, nickel-titanium alloy and stainless steel. These same materials have been used for many years in cardiac stents and other medical devices placed in other parts of the body. The Essure inserts do not contain hormones.

I think I have a nickel allergy. Can I still get Essure?

The Essure insert is made of materials that include a nickel-titanium alloy. Once placed inside the body, small amounts of nickel are released from the inserts. Patients who are allergic to nickel may have an allergic reaction to the inserts. Symptoms include rash, itching, and hives. Talk to your doctor if you think you may have a nickel allergy and he or she will help to determine if Essure is right for you.

Is the Essure procedure painful and what are the most common side effects?

There may be some pain associated with placing Essure. Some women report mild discomfort, pain, and cramping, during or after the placement procedure. Symptoms may be similar to what they might experience in their normal monthly cycle. There are reports of chronic pelvic pain in women, possibly related to Essure.

In the clinical trials, some women reported mild to moderate side effects during and after the procedure. During the procedure, the most common side effect reported was mild to moderate pain (9.3% of women). Some of the women in the study reported moderate pain (12.9% of women) and/or cramping (29.6% of women) on the day of the procedure. A smaller percentage of women reported nausea/vomiting (10.8%) and vaginal bleeding (6.8%). Eighty-eight percent (88%) of women rated tolerance of the placement procedure as good, very good, or excellent.

Click here to learn about additional safety information

Will I be able to feel the Essure inserts in my body?

No, you will not be able to feel the Essure inserts once they have been placed in your fallopian tubes.

Will my partner be able to feel the Essure inserts during sex?

No, since the Essure inserts are placed in the fallopian tubes, your partner will not be able to feel them.

What are the risks or considerations?

As with all procedures, there are risks and considerations associated with Essure. There are reports of chronic pelvic pain in women, possibly related to Essure. There are also reports of the Essure insert migrating into the lower abdomen and pelvis. If this happens, it may be necessary to surgically remove the migrated device. There is also the possibility that, if you become pregnant, it will be an ectopic pregnancy, which can be serious.

Click here to learn about additional risks or see the Patient Information Booklet.

Is Essure covered by insurance?

Essure is covered by most health insurance providers, including Medicaid. Under the Women’s Preventative Services provision of the Affordable Care Act, Essure may be covered by insurance without co-pays, deductibles, or out-of-pocket costs. Call your health insurance company to find out if the Essure procedure and Essure Confirmation Test are covered in full.

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Is Essure reversible?

No. Essure is a permanent birth control method and like other forms of permanent birth control, including tubal ligation and vasectomy, Essure should not be considered a reversible birth control option. It is permanent. Before choosing Essure, you should be certain that you are done having children.

How soon after having a baby can I get Essure?

You cannot have the Essure procedure if you have been pregnant within the past 6 weeks. The efficacy and safety of Essure has not been established in women less than 12 weeks after delivering or terminating a pregnancy. Speak with your doctor about what’s right for you.

After the Essure procedure

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How much time will I need to recover from the procedure?

After the procedure, recovery is quick—most women go home 45 minutes after the procedure and return to normal activities within a day or two.

How soon after having the Essure procedure can I have sex?

Talk to your doctor for more information on this topic.

Find out more about what to expect after the procedure

Will I still get my period? Will it be different?

Yes, you will still have your menstrual period. Some women report slightly lighter or heavier bleeding after the procedure, but these changes may also be due to your stopping your previous hormonal birth control, rather than the Essure procedure.

Can I still use a tampon with Essure?

Yes. Because Essure is placed in your fallopian tubes, and not your vagina, you will still be able to use tampons.

Will I gain weight with Essure?

While weight gain was not studied in the clinical trials for Essure, the Essure inserts do not contain or release any hormones. Talk to your doctor for more information.

What is the Essure Confirmation Test?

The Essure Confirmation Test verifies that the inserts are in the correct location and sometimes tests whether the tubes are blocked. You need to have a confirmation test 3 months after the Essure procedure to confirm that you can rely on Essure for birth control. The Essure Confirmation Test can be a transvaginal ultrasound (TVU), an x-ray exam using a special contrast dye in your uterus, or both. Your doctor will advise you on which method or methods are best for you.

For some women, it may take longer than 3 months to be able to rely on Essure for contraception, requiring a repeat confirmation test at 6 months. That’s why this test is so important. Before receiving this confirmation from your doctor, you must use another form of birth control to prevent pregnancy.

Find out more about the Essure Confirmation Test

Do I need an Essure Confirmation Test?

Yes. The Confirmation Test is an important and necessary step in the Essure procedure. You must continue to use another form of birth control until you have your Essure Confirmation Test and your doctor tells you that you can rely on Essure for birth control. For some women, it may take longer than 3 months for Essure to completely block the fallopian tubes, requiring a repeat confirmation test at 6 months.

Find out more about the Essure Confirmation Test

Can I have an MRI after having the Essure procedure?

The Essure inserts can be safely scanned with MRI only under specific conditions. Before you have an MRI, tell your healthcare provider that you have had the Essure inserts placed.

After your Essure procedure, you will be given an Essure ID card. The ID card tells doctors and others that you have Essure inserts in your fallopian tubes. Show the card when undergoing any procedure involving your uterus or fallopian tube, including an MRI, D&C, hysteroscopy, endometrial biopsy, or endometrial ablation. Body areas near the inserts may be obscured when they are seen on x-rays, MRIs, and other imaging.

Will Essure affect my ability to have other gynecologic procedures?

Tell your doctor that you have Essure inserts when discussing any other gynecologic procedures. After your Essure procedure, you will be given an Essure ID card. The ID card tells doctors and others that you have Essure inserts. Show the card when undergoing any procedure involving your uterus or fallopian tube. These include an MRI, D&C, hysteroscopy, endometrial biopsy, or endometrial ablation. Body areas near the inserts may be obscured when they are seen on x-rays, MRIs, and other imaging. Tell your doctor before having any other gynecologic procedures.